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After school and morning breakfast clubs are a British institution that families across the country find tremendously helpful. These clubs give parents, especially working ones, peace of mind that their children are in good care as they meet their job responsibilities. But how do these more social clubs compare to after school tuition services where children are expected to focus on school work? Is it better to allow your child more time to mingle instead of focussing on maths? Or is a combination of the two the ideal solution?

What do after school clubs offer parents and children?

School clubs are Ofsted-regulated and are usually associated with specific schools in an area. They are partially subsidised and offer activities such as sports, arts and structured play time for children. Homes with two working parents are often given preference to school clubs to help them organise busy schedules, while reducing the cost of after school care.

In some cases, schools may not have clubs associated with them, however, most offer transportation to neighbouring schools where services are available. While some clubs do offer some form of assistance with school work, or allow children to finish their homework tasks, the focus of these clubs are not primarily educational.

School clubs have shown to produce a positive outcome for children from lower income households who may be in need of closer supervision while mum and dad are at work. Studies have found that breakfast clubs, for example, help to prepare children for the school day ahead; this is especially true for clubs that incorporate morning exercises and other preparatory activities for the day. In the case of after school clubs, children benefit from the social aspect that comes with it and can also turn to minders for help with school work.

Are school clubs an alternative to after school tuition services?

The short answer is no. Reason being that school clubs are not specifically geared to provide professional after school tuition services. And while school clubs are required to be Ofsted certified, this does not mean that childminders need to be qualified teachers or tutors. Childminders may be able to assist with basic school work, but this shouldn’t be seen as an alternative to the expertise qualified tutors and teachers bring to the table.

If your requirement is to find suitable care before and after school for your child, then a school club may offer the services that you need. However, if your child is in need of specialised after school tuition to help him or her master challenges with school work, then you should speak to a reputable after school tuition centre. 

The best in after school tuition services offer a blend of socialising and education to provide children with an environment where learning is both fun and rewarding. And perhaps this is where many tuition services fall short; instead of incorporating a bit of fun and socialising in the learning process, many tuition services can feel sterile and cause children to balk at the idea of yet more “stuff” to learn.

Or perhaps a combination of the two might just be what your child needs. Breakfast clubs are indeed a good way to kick off the morning with a catch up on challenging equations to bring a productive day to a close. 

Talk to us about our personalised approach to after school tuition

Boost Education places a strong focus on educational environments that are fun, engaging and supportive. Our classes hold a maximum of four students where children are encouraged to socialise, share ideas and learn through focused exercises that both stimulate and entertain. Contact us today to discuss your child’s educational challenges, our friendly tutors are ready to help.

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